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Watch: Roseanne Barr Explains Why Republican ‘Job Growth’ is Bad for the Poor in Less than 2 Minutes

Beginning the late 1980’s, sitcom Roseanne broke barriers by introducing America to a new version of the American family that was grittier, poorer and more real.

The show, which featured the decidedly working class Conner family also used punchlines and pointed sarcasm to introduce progressive ideas and Roseanne’s unique brand of irreverent political thinking.

In one episode, for example, Rosanne perfectly destroyed a local politician who seemed to think his trickle down job growth plan is good for his community, something that could easily be written today, over twenty years later, for the recent midterms.

“Bringing in business is my number one priority,” the clean-cut white male politician said when he comes to Roseanne’s door, sounding very 2014, GOP-style.

 He then explained he was going to get businesses to come in “through tax incentives. We’re going to make it cheaper for out-of-state businesses to set up shop right here.”

Rosanne, aka the voice of the 99 percent, then asked,  “So they get a tax break? So who’s going to pay the taxes they ain’t paying?”

“Well… you will,” the candidate replied showing only-on-television honesty. “But you’ll be working good, steady employment,” he then added, trying to cover up the fact he just admitted the poor will be the one’s paying most for his plan.

“Union wages?” Roseanne prodded.

When the politician says ‘no’ because unions kills incentives, the comedienne perfect sums up what is wrong with the GOP job-growth plan.

“So there going to dump the unions, so they can come and hire us at scab wages and for that privilege we get to pay their taxes,” Rosanne said, before asking if the politician wants to hear about her life as a struggling worker.

Not surprisingly, the politician does not seem interested at all.

Photo Credit: Screenshot (Roseanne Barr talking about job growth on her sitcom)

H/t: Addicting Info

About the author

Tamar is a New York based freelance writer and photographer whose work has appeared in over 15 publications. You can catch her work regularly on Issue Hawk, Latest, Jspace, and MediaGlobal.

  • susan

    histerical